The Artform Studio Presents: PST LA/LA

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The Tide Was Always High - Josh Kun

The Tide Was Always High gathers together essays, interviews, and analysis from leading academics, artists, journalists, and iconic Latin American musicians to explore the vibrant connections between Los Angeles and Latin America. Published in conjunction with the Getty's Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, the book shows how Latin American musicians and music have helped shape the city’s culture—from Hollywood film sets to recording studios, from vaudeville theaters to Sunset Strip nightclubs, and from Carmen Miranda to Pérez Prado and Juan García Esquivel.

 

Talking to Action - Bill Kelley Jr. 

Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas is an exhibition and bilingual publication that investigates contemporary, community-based social art practices in the Americas. Talking to Action was lead by researcher and curator Bill Kelley Jr., and is part of the Getty’s initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.

 

Show and Tell - Laura Aguliar 

Laura Aguilar's photographs provocatively challenge prevailing notions of beauty, sexuality, and identity. This is the first major survey of Aguilar's work, which often takes the artist's own body as its subject.

 

Ism, Ism, Ism I Ismo, Ismo, Ismo- Jesse Lerner: 

Ism, Ism, Ism / Ismo, Ismo, Ismo is the first comprehensive, United States–based film program and catalogue to treat the full breadth of Latin America’s vibrant experimental film production. The exhibition features key historical and contemporary films from Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela, Puerto Rico and the United States. From innovative works by Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica and Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo to the breathtaking yet practically unknown ouevre of queer Ecuadorian filmmaker Eduardo Solá Franco, the exhibition takes both the aficionado and the open-minded viewer on a journey into a wealth of materials culled from the forgotten corners of Latin American film archives. Equally unprecedented in its approach and scope, the accompanying fully bilingual catalogue features major scholars and artists working across nationalities, mediums, and time periods. Lerner and Piazza assemble a mix of original content authored by key curators, scholars, and archivists from Latin America: eighteen essays and articles translated for the first time pertaining to the history of Latin American experimental film, historical image-documents that are fundamental to the history of experimental film in Latin America, and program notes from the exhibition’s programs. The collection is an invaluable resource for scholars, curators, artists and others interested in the history of Latin America, modern art, experimental and avant garde film, political and Third Cinema, and other noncommercial cinemas.

Sherry YoungeComment